A new advocacy player

This article is co-published with ArchiTeam. In July last year, ArchiTeam launched a working group tasked to find ways it might "educate the public about the value of architects through marketing and public outreach". This endeavour proposes to engage in both marketing and advocacy activities, a canny mix of pragmatism and altruism that I believe has the power to simultaneously promote our... Continue Reading →

The challenges of geography

There are many residential architecture studios in Melbourne whose portfolios are concentrated within specific geographical regions: the south-eastern suburbs, the inner-north, bayside, the Mornington Peninsula, Ballarat. I live in Carlton North and seem to see Robert Simeoni signs on front fences everywhere. Zen Architects does a lot of work in and around Northcote. Jolson Architects has nailed the Toorak market. I don't... Continue Reading →

Explaining the architectural fee

According to the standard client and architect agreement published by the Australian Institute of Architects, there are three traditional methods by which an architect can charge fees to her client: Percentage fee Lump sum fee Hourly rates[1] There's a fourth method that's emerging amongst younger practices, inspired by the lean startup strategy and the practice of web-based design platforms... Continue Reading →

How Soon Is Now?

The Australian Institute of Architects' annual national conference, How Soon Is Now?,  was held last month in Adelaide. Creatively directed by Cameron Bruhn, Sam Spurr and Ben Hewett, it explored the "agency of architecture to make real changes in the world."[1] The directors identified the expansive conversation of last year's conference, Risk, as a precursor, and proposed to... Continue Reading →

Reform at the AIA

In recent months, members of the Australian Institute of Architects have received a stream of emails addressing substantial changes underway within the organisation. The changes target the very heart of the Institute and systematically rethink the way it functions. This is a subject I've discussed previously (see Why I'm a member of the AIA and A better AIA), so have followed the proposed... Continue Reading →

The triangle offensive

This is the 6th of twenty-one lessons for design students, gathered from the combined experience of being a student, and teaching students. I will published one lesson each weekday until they're done. 6. The triangle offensive At the Australian Institute of Architects national conference this year, keynote speaker Gregg Pasquarelli suggested a powerful test of any idea: A good... Continue Reading →

A better AIA

Last month, I wrote an article asking why I'm a member of the Australian Institute of Architects. I acknowledged that the principle reasons are altruistic: the AIA allows me to participate in my profession; it forges a strong profession; and it articulates ambition for our collective future. I also acknowledged that while there is of course a... Continue Reading →

Reflecting on Risk 2015

What was it? The Australian Institute of Architects‘ annual architecture conference, held two weeks ago in Melbourne. Creatively directed by Donald Bates, Hamish Lyon and Andrew Mackenzie, it explored the changing role of risk in architecture. The directors framed the discussion by observing that "No one wants to be a safe architect. Safety assumes the conventional and the predictable. Who wants... Continue Reading →

Why I’m a member of the AIA

Last week, the Victorian chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects hosted its second annual members forum. Chapter Councillors Amy Muir and Stuart Harrison chaired a panel that fielded questions "on the role and direction of the profession, with a focus on media and engagement".[1] The event was free and intended for members' ears only, a deliberate... Continue Reading →

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑